Archive for Kyle Wall

The 3rd of Four Tips in Designing a Good Mobile Application

Lily Taharudin / Application Consultant

Have you ever been annoyed when you encounter a web page where you have to scroll and scroll to get to the content you want? Imagine the same page on your phone. You’d quickly give up trying to find the information you need. Complexity is another issue. When there is too much content crammed on a page, it can be very difficult to read.

While there is a legitimate fear that people won’t click to another page, most will be more likely to look elsewhere when they struggle to locate the data they want. Good headers taking you to new pages will make your application far more usable and likeable to your customers and employees.

Imagine a restaurant site. One might have a set of beautiful pictures, followed by their location and hours, then a link to menus and a way to make a reservation. For someone already sure they want to eat there, they want to get to contact/reservation information instantly. A more successful site might have the following headers, leading to new pages:

Screen Shot 2016-01-12 at 2.32.30 PM

Each page might have a different restaurant image, but this design allows anyone to quickly get to the information they need.

Here is a real-world example of a great mobile screen:

3_of_4_tips

The basic information is available on the first screen and you don’t have to scroll. Each page has a full page of related data. You only scroll as far as you need to go.

Keep this in mind when you are designing your mobile applications. When it comes to a mobile application, simpler is better.

User Storage for C# and Java

Lorenz Alder, Senior Consultant / Software Architect

User Storage helps us with integration of third party libraries such as mail, ftp, NoSQL DB, file system access etc. Once an object is instantiated through source code, we store it in User Storage and make it accessible to all CA Plex functions in the call graph.

The CA Plex runtime supports the following methods to store any Java or C# object in a globally accessible Store.

Set

public void setToUserStorage(String key, Object obj)

Get

public Object getFromUserStorage(String key)

Remove

public void removeFromUserStorage(String key)

Java syntax examples

getApp().setToUserStorage("WantToFindTheObjWithThisName", myObj);myClass myObj = (myClass)(getApp().getFromUserStorage("WantToFindTheObjWithThisName"));if(myObj != null){    // do some stuff with myObj}

C# syntax examples

M_ObApp.setToUserStorage("WantToFindTheObjWithThisName", myObj);myClass myObj = (myClass)(M_ObApp.getFromUserStorage("WantToFindTheObjWithThisName"));if(myObj != null){    // do some stuff with myObj}

Best practice

Create wrapper classes for third party libraries with only the methods you actually need. This simplifies the API and will let you change the implementation easily when better libraries become available.

The 2nd of Four Tips in Designing a Good Mobile Application

Lily Taharudin / Application Consultant

Web and mobile are different.  When you are building things for the web, it may seem easy simply to port it to mobile devices, but the user experience may not be as good.  Instead, consider the smaller form factor and adapt your design to make it easier for mobile customers to interact with the application.

The second tip is to use bigger fonts and buttons for mobile apps.  Even the most adept mobile user may find it difficult to read your content and accurately select the option they want if the font and buttons are too small.  The goal is to ensure that they won’t have to zoom into the page to click or read the content.  You also want to make sure that they don’t click the wrong button and then have to start over.  Either problem increases user frustration and may lead to them abandoning your site.

q3p948hqpascjmc

Note the differences here.  The web application assumes that the user has a full screen so has smaller print and buttons that are easy to click on with a mouse.  However, for the mobile app, CM First increased the size of the font and used buttons that are big enough to be easily manipulated with a thumb or finger.

Always use yourself as a test subject.  If you find it hard to deal with your mobile app, so will your customers.

 

 
 
© 2013 CM First Group - All rights reserved