Archive for October 12, 2015

Free Tools to Make Your CM WebClient Apps Shine

by Andrew Leggett / Sr. Application Consultant

CM WebClient, CM WebClient Mobile and CM WebClient HSync all allow you to customize the style, appearance and behavior of your web applications. But what if you want a little more? What else can you do? The following sites provide free tools that run within the browser to help you make your applications stand out.

1. JSFiddle (http://jsfiddle.net/) lets you quickly try out your JavaScript, HTML and CSS code right in the browser. Your ‘fiddles’ can be saved so that you can test them out in different browsers, or allow others to collaborate.

2. Sencha Fiddle (https://fiddle.sencha.com/) is similar to JSFiddle, but is designed for the Sencha Touch framework used by CM WebClient Mobile and CM WebClient HSync. Run and test your code instantly.

3. Free Icon Maker (https://freeiconmaker.com/ – requires Adobe Flash) provides a large collection of scalable icons, plus tools to customize their appearance. Treat your users to a modern, consistent makeover.

4. CSS3 Generator (http://css3generator.com/) allows you to try out different styles without having to learn CSS. Simply paste the results into your CSS file to add some style.

5. Paletton (http://paletton.com/) – Some color combinations simply look better than others. This tool can help you pick colors for your application that are easy on the eye.

6. Chrome Developer Tools (http://webdesign.tutsplus.com/articles/faster-htmlcss-workflow-with-chrome-developer-tools–webdesign-8314) this tutorial explains how you can use the Chrome F12 Developer tools to prototype in real-time how the visual designs you created with the above tools will make your CM WebClient application look.

Be a web application wizard without having to beg management for more software and without having to learn new languages.

The 2nd of Four Tips in Designing a Good Mobile Application

Lily Taharudin / Application Consultant

Web and mobile are different.  When you are building things for the web, it may seem easy simply to port it to mobile devices, but the user experience may not be as good.  Instead, consider the smaller form factor and adapt your design to make it easier for mobile customers to interact with the application.

The second tip is to use bigger fonts and buttons for mobile apps.  Even the most adept mobile user may find it difficult to read your content and accurately select the option they want if the font and buttons are too small.  The goal is to ensure that they won’t have to zoom into the page to click or read the content.  You also want to make sure that they don’t click the wrong button and then have to start over.  Either problem increases user frustration and may lead to them abandoning your site.

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Note the differences here.  The web application assumes that the user has a full screen so has smaller print and buttons that are easy to click on with a mouse.  However, for the mobile app, CM First increased the size of the font and used buttons that are big enough to be easily manipulated with a thumb or finger.

Always use yourself as a test subject.  If you find it hard to deal with your mobile app, so will your customers.

 

 
 
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